Participating Organizations

CENC Leadership Centers

Dr. David Cifu, M.D.

David Cifu, M.D.

Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia

Dr. Cifu is the Principal Investigator of the Chronic Effects of Neurotrauma Consortium.

David is also the Herman J. Flax, M.D. Professor of the Department of PM&R at the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) School of Medicine in Richmond, Virginia. In his 20 years as an academic physiatrist, he has delivered more than 425 regional, national and international lectures, published more than 165 articles and 65 abstracts, and co-authored 20 books and book chapters. He is also the Past President of the American Academy of PM&R.

www.pmr.vcu.edu

COL Sidney R. Hinds II, M.D.

COL Sidney R. Hinds II, M.D.

Fort Detrick, Frederick, Maryland

COL Hinds is a soldier-physician and represents the DoD as a CENC Co-PI.

He is a neurologist and nuclear medicine physician with over 16 years clinical, clinical research and administrative experience. He currently serves as the DoD Brain Health Research Coordinator, Blast Injury Research Program Coordinating Office and Medical Advisor to the Principal Assistant for Research and Technology for the Army's Medical Research and Materiel Command. He recently served as the National Director of the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) and as the Afghanistan Theater Neurologist. He was a medical platoon leader and executive officer during Operation Desert Shield/Storm.

blastinjuryresearch.amedd.army.mil

Dr. Rick Williams, Ph.D.

Rick Williams, Ph.D.

RTI International, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina

Dr. Williams is a fellow of the American Statistical Association with more than 30 years of experience in medical and epidemiological research.

He has led eight major multisite research projects coordinating the efforts of dozens of research sites across the United States. He designs and leads population surveys, observational studies, and randomized clinical trials. He frequently conducts workshops and training classes on the use of statistical analysis methods for cluster-correlated, longitudinal, or repeated measures data, such as generalized estimating equations for marginal models, hierarchical linear and nonlinear mixed models, and multilevel models. He has also led the selection and implementation of data capture and data management systems for clinical studies at RTI. He holds a PhD in Biostatistics with specialization in Epidemiology.

www.pmr.vcu.edu

Consortium Members

The Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) was founded in 1961, in partnership with St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center located downtown in Phoenix and is 10 minutes from the Phoenix VA. Barrow Neurological Institute is the world's largest neurological disease treatment and research institution, and is consistently ranked as one of the best neurosurgical training centers in the United States. Barrow receives referrals from all over the world and is internationally recognized for the treatment of brain disorders including brain trauma due to concussion. The Barrow Concussion and Brain Injury Center, the first of its kind in the nation, is the nation's most comprehensive concussion prevention, treatment, and education program. It offers comprehensive, compassionate, cutting-edge treatment and rehabilitation for adolescents and adults with concussions, traumatic brain injuries, and spinal cord injuries. The CENC staff at the Barrow is comprised basic researchers in the neurobiology of brain trauma, neurologists, clinical psychologists, research psychologists and research assistants. The CENC team has regular access Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and ALS Research centers and the Phoenix VA TBI clinical research team.

Dr. Elliott Mufson, Ph.D.

Elliott Mufson, Ph.D.

Dr. Mufson is an internationally recognized leader in the field of dementia who specializes in determining the molecular signatures that characterize selectively vulnerable neurons during aging and disease using rodent, non-human primate and human tissue specimens. Dr. Mufson was a pioneer in the use of single cell gene profiling in the field of human AD and mouse models of this disease. He has worked and published with Dr. Binder for many years and they are currently members of Dr. Mufson’s NIA funded program project grant titled "Neurobiology of Mild Cognitive Impairment in the Elderly." Dr. Mufson is serving as the PI for Study 5: Tau Modifications study.

www.thebarrow.org

Dr. Elisabeth Wilde, Ph.D.

Elisabeth Wilde, Ph.D.

Dr. Wilde is the Scientific Director of the Imaging Core for the TBI Center of Excellence (COE) at the Michael E. DeBakey VAMC in Houston. She directs the Imaging Core for an NIH-funded program project on mild TBI, and is involved in several imaging studies of TBI in both military and civilian populations.

www.bcm.edu

Dr. Harvey Levin, Ph.D.

Harvey Levin, Ph.D.

Dr. Levin is Director of the TBI Center of Excellence at the Michael E. De Bakey VA and is a renowned expert in TBI, having led numerous CDC, DoD, NIH, and VA-funded studies of TBI. He is Professor of Neurology, Neurosurgery, Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, and Pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine. He is a past president of the International Neuropsychological Society. He is also a recipient of the Javits Neuroscience Investigator Award (NINDS), the Jennett-Plum Award for TBI Research from the International Brain Injury Association, and the Deborah Warden Lectureship awarded by DVBIC.

www.bcm.edu

Dr. Nicholas Pastorek, Ph.D.

Nicholas Pastorek, Ph.D.

Dr. Pastorek is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. In 2014 he received the Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Houston Neuropsychology Society. His research interests include neuropsychological effects of mTBI and PTSD in service members and veterans. Dr Pastorek is serving as co-principle investigator.

www.bcm.edu

Dr. Lee Goldstein, M.D., Ph.D.

Lee Goldstein, M.D., Ph.D.

 

www.bu.edu

Dr. Ann McKee, M.D.

Ann McKee, M.D.

Tracy Abildskov
Dr. Erin Bigler, Ph.D.

Erin Bigler, Ph.D.

Dr. Bigler is a Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience and Psychiatry and has been involved in traumatic brain injury (TBI) research for almost 40 years. He established one of the first quantitative neuroimaging labs at the University of Texas and has made major contributions to the area of brain imaging quantification with extensive publications. Dr. Bigler has worked continuously with Drs. Levin, Wilde, and Tate for over 20 years, has been the president of the National Academy of Neuropsychology (NAN), is a founder and Associate Editor of Brain Imaging and Behavior (among other journals), and currently directs the Brain Imaging and Behavior Laboratory at BYU. He is also Board Certified and continues to oversee testing and guide the management of patients with TBI at the BYU Comprehensive Clinic. His far-reaching brain and neuroscience research has focused on how to best integrate neuroimaging with neuropsychology through image analyses. With long-time research funding support from NIH, NSF and DoD, he has addressed a number of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders, including traumatic brain injury, autism, CO poisoning, and Alzheimer’s disease while advancing the basic science of neuropsychology and brain rehabilitation and neuroadaptation. Dr. Bigler’s lab has been instrumental in providing image analysis resources for several large multisite neuroimaging projects both past (e.g., DHHS PHS 1 R01 HD048946-01A2 “Neuroimaging Analysis of Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury and DHHS/NIH/NIMH 1 R01 MH080826 “Neuroimaging Analysis of Atypical Neurodevelopment in Autism” and present.

www.neuroscience.byu.edu

Dr. Brenda Plassman, Ph.D.

Brenda Plassman, Ph.D.

Dr. Plassman is Professor in the Division of Medical Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and Director of the Program in Epidemiology of Dementia at Duke University Medical Center. Dr. Plassman’s focus of research has been on the epidemiology of dementia and cognitive decline in late life in diverse population-based samples. She has worked on several epidemiological studies including the Duke Twins Study of Memory in Aging; the Veterans Study of Memory in Aging; the Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study (ADAMS) which is a sub-study of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS); and the Cache County, UT Memory Study. The work on these projects and others has spanned a number of scientific issues including: a) refinement of clinical assessment and diagnostic methods for early detection of dementia and cognitive decline in community-based samples, b) assessing the progression of cognitive, functional, and neurobehavioral decline throughout the course of progressive cognitive decline, c) estimating the national prevalence and incidence of dementia and mild cognitive impairment, and d) investigating associations between potential risk or protective factors and dementia. Dr. Plassman continues to do secondary analyses on the archived data from the epidemiological studies. Drs. McCrea and Plassman serve as Co-Investigators and co-lead on the Epidemiology Project Aim 4.

http://medschool.duke.edu/

Dr. Heechin Chae, M.D.

Heechin Chae, M.D.

Dr. Heechin Chae serves as the Director of Intrepid Spirit One at Fort Belvoir Community Hospital. Dr. Chae received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology from the University of Virginia and Doctor of Medicine from Medical College of Virginia/Virginia Commonwealth University. He subsequently completed his Medical Internship and Residency in Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation through the Harvard Medical School system in Boston, MA. A board certified Physiatrist with more than fifteen years experience in clinical practice and research in traumatic brain injuries, he now serves as the Site Director of the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center at Fort Belvoir in addition to his appointment as the Director of the Department of Traumatic Brain Injury. Dr. Chae, prior to his arrival at Fort Belvoir in 2011, spent over fifteen years at the Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital and in the Harvard Medical School System in Boston where he held the faculty appointment as Assistant Professor of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. He was involved in extensive research and teaching activities while treating patients with mild, moderate and severe traumatic brain injuries. Dr. Chae has been recognized throughout his career with numerous awards, including "Medical All-Star" by the Boston Red Sox. He is also Board Certified in Pain Medicine.

www.fbch.capmed.mil/

Dr. Maulik P. Purohit, M. D., Ph.D.

Maulik P. Purohit, M. D., Ph.D.

Dr. Purohit is the Site PI at Fort Belvoir for the Chronic Effects of Neurotrauma Consortium Longitudinal Study. He is the Director of Research at the Department of Defense National Intrepid Center of Excellence (NICoE), Fort Belvoir, Virginia. In his position as Director of Research, he has helped establish a wide research portfolio, including collaborations with many institutions including Walter Reed, USUHS, NIH, VCU, and other academic centers to establish a research infrastructure to perform clinical research in the areas of brain injury including epidemiology, advanced diagnostics, advanced neuroimaging, biomarkers, nutrition, and sleep.

www.nicoe.capmed.mil

The Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine, Inc. (HJF) is a private, not-for-profit organization authorized by Congress to support medical research and education at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences and throughout the armed forces. Headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, HJF's 2,450 employees work in 27 states, the District of Columbia and 10 foreign nations.

Our global organization serves military, medical and government clients by administrating and supporting scientific programs that benefit service members, veterans and civilians alike. HJF has met the needs of its customers since 1983—providing scientific and research management, infrastructure, and staff recruitment to researchers, clinicians and educators around the world.

Congress authorized HJF to support research and education at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences and throughout the armed forces. HJF also facilitates the exchange of expertise and information between the military and private sectors by serving as a vital link between the military medical community and our federal and private partners.

Our mission has placed us where medicine and science are most needed: advanced surgery, biomedical defense, combat injury, emergency medicine, humanitarian assistance and infectious disease. We go wherever the mission takes us—to the heart of West Africa's fight against the scourge of Ebola, to Afghanistan to provide training on disaster and humanitarian medicine, and to Brazil to conduct site visits for HIV-related clinical trials.

Learn more at www.hjf.org.

Dr. Connie Duncan, Ph.D.

Connie Duncan, Ph.D.

 

www.hjf.org

The Hunter Holmes McGuire VA Medical Center, which opened in 1946, is currently one of the VA's leading medical centers and serves as a tertiary care referral center. The McGuire VA is located approximately 10 minutes south of the historic Downtown Richmond area and is associated with community-based outpatient clinics in Fredericksburg, Charlottesville and Emporia. It collectively serves more than 200,000 veterans from 52 cities and counties, covering 22,515 miles of central and south Virginia, and parts of North Carolina. The 1.2 million square foot facility in Richmond contains a polytrauma center of excellence, a radiation therapy facility, an MRI suite, a large spinal cord injury and disorders unit, a hospice unit, nursing home care unit, and extensive ambulatory care facilities. For over 14 years, Richmond VAMC has been a leader in traumatic brain injury and has participated actively in the development of the Defense and Veterans Head Injury Program (DVHIP) and became one of the four lead traumatic brain injury centers, specializing in TBI rehabilitation services for active duty service members and veterans. In 2005 the Veterans Health Administration designated the Richmond VAMC as one of four national Polytrauma Rehabilitation Centers, offering both inpatient and outpatient programs to cover the spectrum of traumatic brain injury and additional injuries that may have occurred. The CENC staff at the Richmond VA is comprised of physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians, clinical nurse specialists, program coordinators, neurologists, clinical psychologists, research psychologists and research assistants. The CENC team has regular access to polytrauma experts, an Epilepsy Center of Excellence, a Parkinson's Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center, computerized dynamic posturography equipment and eye tracking apparatus.

Justin Alicea

Justin Alicea, CCRP

Mr. Alicea received his Bachelor of Science degree in Physiological Psychology from the City University of New York. He is a Society of Clinical Research Coordinators (SOCRA) Certified Clinical Research Professional and his research interests include PTSD and mTBI treatments for active duty military and veterans.

www.pmr.vcu.edu

Dr. William Carne, Ph.D.

William Carne, Ph.D.

William Carne, Ph.D. is the Research Coordinator for the CENC. Dr. Carne is an Associate Professor in PM&R at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in Richmond, Virginia. He is a licensed clinical psychologist with 33 years of direct patient care experience and research and has over two dozen peer reviewed manuscripts published.

www.pmr.vcu.edu

Dr. David Cifu, M.D.

David Cifu, M.D.

Dr. Cifu is the Principal Investigator of the Chronic Effects of Neurotrauma Consortium. David is also the Herman J. Flax, M.D. Professor of the Department of PM&R at the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) School of Medicine in Richmond, Virginia. In his 20 years as an academic physiatrist, he has delivered more than 425 regional, national and international lectures, published more than 165 articles and 65 abstracts, and co-authored 20 books and book chapters. He is also the Past President of the American Academy of PM&R.

www.pmr.vcu.edu

Dr. Laura Manning-Franke, Ph.D.

Laura Manning-Franke, Ph.D.

Laura Franke is a Research Psychologist for the CENC and the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) at the McGuire VA Medical Center. She is also an affiliate of the department of PM&R at VCU. Her research focuses on neurophysiological measures of mTBI effects and recovery. She has published a number of articles and abstracts on outcomes of TBI in Veterans and active duty personnel, on topics including brain morphometrics, electroencephalography, and sensory integration.

www.pmr.vcu.edu

Dr. Ajit Pai, M.D.

Ajit Pai, M.D.

Dr Pai is currently the Medical Director of the Polytrauma Rehabilitation Center at the Hunter Holmes McGuire VA Medical Center in Richmond Virginia. Whilst training at Virginia Commonwealth University he received the Herman J. Flax Resident Education and Leadership Award, the VCU PM&R Research Excellence Award, The Gerry Bertier SCI Research Award, and the Gadi PM&R Service Award. Dr Pai is serving as co-principle investigator.

www.richmond.va.gov/

Dr. William Walker, M.D.

William Walker, M.D.

William Walker, M.D. is the CENC Study 1 Observational Study on Late Neurologic Effects of OEF/OIF/OND Combat Principal Investigator and Researcher for the CENC. Dr. Walker is also the Ernst and Helga Prosser Professor and Vice Chairman of Clinical Care in PM&R at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in Richmond, Virginia. Dr. Walker is board-certified in PM&R with 20 years’ experience performing clinical care and research with TBI and has over 50 peer reviewed manuscripts published.

www.pmr.vcu.edu

Since 1952, the Iowa City VA Health Care System has been improving the health of the men and women who have so proudly served our nation. Services are available to more than 184,000 veterans living in 50 counties in Eastern Iowa, Western Illinois and Northern Missouri. CENC supported research on the visual system in traumatic brain injury is conducted primarily at the Iowa City VA Center of Excellence. For specialized analysis and collaborative projects, research also occurs in some cases at approved facilities, such as the image analysis laboratories in the Seamans Engineering Center, the VA Eye Clinic, the UIHC Dept. Ophthalmology and the Wynn Institute for Vision.

The VA Health Care System itself contains a superb VA Eye Clinic that is staffed by 7 faculty and 3 residents from the University of Iowa Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences. The VA Eye Clinic consists of 10 exam lanes, 4 rooms for ancillary testing (visual field, optical coherence tomography or OCT, fundus photography) and attends to approximately 10,000 veterans/year for their vision care. A large eye clinic staffing room is also present with multimedia capabilities for video and digital image editing and educational presentations. The VA Health Care System also has a very active clinic for evaluation and treatment of Traumatic Brain Injury and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in which they collaborate for TBI related research. Specialized state-of-the-art equipment for testing the visual system includes: equipment -imaging, visual function, and electrophysiologic testing (i.e. ERG, OCT imaging systems, digital HR fundus cameras, laser speckle retina and choroid blood flow analyzer, HRT confocal retinal/corneal camera, Biopac system, computerized pupilometers, HFA, automated and manual kinetic perimeters, clinical PERG testing units, 3D video tracking systems, digital microscope and digital pathology analyzer.

CENC Visual System Research Team includes Dr. Randy H. Kardon an internationally known clinician-scientist regarding neuro-ophthalmic disorders as well as health research science specialists, statisticians, and research coordinators that provide extensive experience in the area of prevention and treatment of visual loss.

Dr. Randy Kardon, M.D., Ph.D.

Randy Kardon, M.D., Ph.D.

Dr. Kardon is currently the Director of the Neuro-ophthalmology Division in the Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences at the University of Iowa. In recent years he has received the Senior Achievement Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology, been awarded the Pomerantz Family Chair in Ophthalmology and received the ARVO Silver Fellow Award. Dr Kardon is the PI for the visual sensory impairments and progression following mild traumatic brain injury study.

www.iowacity.va.gov

The James A. Haley VA Medical Center is a 327-bed tertiary care teaching hospital dedicated to providing the highest quality of inpatient, outpatient, and rehabilitation care and services to Veterans and eligible Service members in Central Florida. The Tampa VA Hospital provides care to 142,000 veterans in Central Florida and has been recognized as a Center of Excellence in Rehabilitation and Spinal Cord Injury Medicine. Over 128 beds are dedicated to veterans with severe disabilities. Eight CARF Accredited Rehabilitation Programs provide the highest quality of Rehabilitation care in the country. Best Practices have been awarded to the Pain, Chaplain Service and Vocational Rehabilitation Programs. The Olin Teague Award, the highest VA award recognizing care to those injured in Wars was given to Tampa's Pain Program (2004).

The Tampa VA Brain Injury Program is a CARF accredited comprehensive inpatient brain injury rehabilitation program. We are the lead brain injury program for the VA in the southern United States and one of seven VA or military sites involved in ongoing brain injury research through the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC), formerly the Defense and Veteran Head Injury Program (DVHIP). We offer state-of-the-art physical and cognitive rehabilitation services as well as access to innovative clinical research initiatives to eligible veterans and active duty military service members with brain injuries.

Dr. Heather Belanger, Ph.D.

Heather Belanger, Ph.D.

Dr. Belanger, ABPP is the site PI in Tampa for the Chronic Effects of Neurotrauma Consortium longitudinal study. She is a clinical neuropsychologist at the Tampa VA, and an associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences at the University of South Florida. She is a fellow of Division 40 of APA, is a Diplomat in Clinical Neuropsychology, and has published widely in the area of TBI. She leads two funded studies related to mild TBI, one of which is a web-based psycho- educational intervention for reducing postconcussion symptoms. She currently serves as Secretary for the Society for Clinical Neuropsychology, is on the Board of Directors for the American Board of Clinical Neuropsychology, and on the Board of Convention Affairs for the American Psychological Association.

www.va.gov

Dr. Risa Richardson, Ph.D.

Risa Richardson, Ph.D.

Dr. Richardson is a clinical neuropsychologist with 15 years’ experience working in TBI neurorehabilitation in both clinical and research capacities. She is on staff at the Polytrauma Rehabilitation Center at James A. Haley Veterans Hospital and University of South Florida (Departments of Pulmonary Sleep Medicine). She has 42 publications in peer-reviewed journals and over 100 presentations at national and international conferences. She has served various research roles including principle investigator, investigator, research director, and project manager on TBI grants from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (N=6), VA Health Services Research and Development, and National Academy of Neuropsychology. During her tenure in rehabilitation, she has actively participated towards the improvement of rehabilitation of persons with TBI through clinical research and advocacy in her leadership roles through the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine.

www.va.gov

Dr. Rodney Vanderploeg, Ph.D.

Rodney Vanderploeg, Ph.D.

Dr. Vanderploeg is a clinical neuropsychologist with many years of experience working clinically with the full spectrum of TBI severity. He is a fellow of Division 40 of APA and the National Academy of Neuropsychology, a Diplomat in Clinical Neuropsychology, and on the Editorial Boards of Rehabilitation Psychology, Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, Psychological Services, and Applied Neuropsychology. He recently completed two VHA funded studies related to TBI, one of which was a validation of the VA’s TBI Clinical Reminder Screen and the other the development of a deployment-related TBI quality of life measure.

www.va.gov

The Houston Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center (MEDVAMC) originally opened in 1946 and is currently one of the largest facilities in the national VA Medical Center system. Located near the Texas Medical Center on a 118-acre campus and built in 1991, the current facility is state-of-the-art and has 386 hospital beds, a 40-bed Spinal Cord Injury Center, and a 120-bed transitional care unit for long-term care. Including the outpatient clinics in Beaumont, Conroe, Lufkin, and Galveston, the Houston MEDVAMC outpatient clinics logged almost one million outpatient visits in the last fiscal year. Supported with more than $22 million annually, research conducted by the Houston MEDVAMC staff ensures Veterans' access to cutting-edge medical and health care technology. In addition to tertiary clinical care services, the Houston MEDVAMC houses many large research units, contributing to a culture of inquiry and scientific engagement among faculty, staff, and patients. The Houston Center for Quality of Care and Utilization Studies, Substance Use Disorder (QUERI), and VISN 16 Mental Illness Research and Clinical Care Center (MIRECC) represent a supportive and collaborative broader scientific community. One out of every eleven Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) Veterans eligible for VHA care lives within VISN 16, the highest number of any VISN. The Houston MEDVAMC, the largest hospital in VISN 16, sees 5-10 new OEF/OIF/OND (Operation New Dawn) Veterans per day. The OEF/OIF Program has a busy outreach schedule, attending 1-2 yellow ribbon and other events in the greater Houston metropolitan area per week. Most OEF/OIF Veterans new to the Houston MEDVAMC are seen at a post-deployment clinic that coordinates physical, mental and psychosocial health assessments and referral to our Level II Polytrauma Clinic when indicated. Patients are then referred to a primary care provider who follows up on the plan and coordinates treatment, with the assessment and care of traumatic brain injury provided through the Polytrauma Clinic. The Houston MEDVAMC has a dedicated research MRI scanner and is home to a Polytrauma Network Site, one of the VA's six Parkinson's Disease Research, Education, and Clinical Centers (PADRECC), a VA Epilepsy Center of Excellence, and is a performance site for the Chronic Effects of Neurotrauma Consortium (CENC). The CENC research team at the Houston MEDVAMC includes neuropsychologists, research psychologists, program coordinators, research assistants, and a medical imaging physicist.

Dr. Randall S. Scheibel, Ph.D.

Randall S. Scheibel, Ph.D.

Dr. Scheibel is a clinical neuropsychologist, a professor at Baylor College of Medicine, and a co-investigator with the TBI Center of Excellence at the Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center. He is also the principal investigator of a VA funded study examining the long-term effects of deployment-related TBI in OEF/OIF/OND Veterans and Service members. Dr. Scheibel has had experience with neuropsychological assessment, group and individual psychotherapy, and cognitive remediation in individuals who have experienced TBI. In addition, over the past 12 years he has been heavily involved in the acquisition, post-acquisition processing, analysis, and interpretation of MRI data. This role has often included the management of image analysis laboratories and their personnel, equipment, and software. His most recent publications have included the study of TBI and comorbid conditions (e.g., PTSD) using data from behavioral assessments and a variety of imaging modalities, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and the volumetric and lesion analysis of anatomical MRI data.

www.bcm.edu

Dr. Brian Taylor, Ph.D.

Brian Taylor, Ph.D.

Dr. Taylor is a Research Physicist at the Research Service Line and the Diagnostic & Therapeutic Care Line at the Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, and Assistant Professor in the Departments of Radiology and Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston Texas. Recently he has received the Aaron Blanchard Research Award in Medical Physics and the Andrew Sowell-Wade Huggins Scholarship in Cancer Research. Dr Taylor serves as co-investigator and imaging physicist for the Imaging Core.

www.bcm.edu

Dr. Maya Troyanskaya, M.D.

Maya Troyanskaya, M.D.

Dr Troyanskaya is currently an Assistant Professor at Baylor College of Medicine and a Health Science Specialist at the Michael E Debakey VA Medical Center in Houston Texas. She has published over 17 peer review articles internationally. Dr Troyanskaya is serving as co-principle investigator.

www.bcm.edu

Dr. Thomas Hammeke, Ph.D.
Dr. Michael McCrea, Ph.D.

Michael McCrea, Ph.D.

Dr. McCrea is a Professor of Neurosurgery and Director of Brain Injury Research at the Medical College of Wisconsin, and a research neuropsychologist at the Clement Zablocki VA Medical Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He has been an active researcher in the neurosciences, with numerous scientific publications, book chapters, and national and international lectures on the topic of traumatic brain injury. Dr. McCrea’s research interest focuses primarily on the acute and chronic effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI). He is the principal investigator on several studies that use a multitude of modalities to research the natural course of clinical and physiological recovery after TBI. He authored the text Mild Traumatic Brain Injury and Postconcussion Syndrome: The New Evidence Base for Diagnosis and Treatment published by Oxford University Press. He is a member of the United States Department of Defense Health Board External Advisory Committee on Traumatic Brain Injury advising the Office of the Secretary of Defense on management and research of military related traumatic brain injury. He is the current President of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology (AACN).

www.mcw.edu

The Minneapolis VA Health Care System, located approximately 15 minutes south of Minneapolis and St. Paul, is a teaching hospital providing a full range of patient care services with state-of-the-art technology, as well as education and research. Comprehensive health care is provided through primary care, tertiary care and long-term care in areas of medicine, surgery, psychiatry, physical medicine and rehabilitation, neurology, oncology, dentistry, geriatrics and extended care. The Minneapolis VAHCS is designated as one of four Polytrauma VA Medical Centers and one of five DVBIC VA sites. As such, the medical center receives active-duty service members and Veterans for rehabilitation of injuries such as traumatic brain injury, blindness and amputation. A 10-bed transitional and community re-entry unit for polytrauma patients provides continued rehabilitation therapies to assist Veterans and active-duty service members to reach their highest level of independence in the community. Minneapolis VA Health Care System works to ensure rural Veterans have access to care by offering health care through tele-health and through Community Clinics, which serve over 18,000 Veterans throughout Minnesota and Western Wisconsin. CENC members located at the Minneapolis VAHCS include physicians, program coordinators, clinical psychologists, research psychologists, and research assistants with established experience conducting intensive research on military TBI. The CENC team has regular access to polytrauma experts, clinical neuropsychologists, and a Brain Sciences Center at the Minneapolis VAHCS, as well as cutting edge MRI technology at the University of Minnesota's Center for Magnetic Resonance Research.

Dr. Nicholas Davenport, Ph.D.

Nicholas Davenport, Ph.D.

Dr. Davenport is a researcher at the Minneapolis VA Health Care System and Assistant Professor in Psychiatry at the University of Minnesota. His research interests focus on the development and application of neuroimaging methods to the study of clinical conditions, including TBI, PTSD, ADHD, and schizophrenia. Dr. Davenport is Principal Investigator of the "Clinical and Neuroimaging Correlates of Neurodegeneration in Military mTBI" study.

www.minneapolis.va.gov

Dr. Kelvin Lim, M.D.

Kelvin O. Lim, M.D.

Dr. Lim is the Drs. T.J. and Ella M. Arneson Land Grant Chair in Human Behavior and Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Minnesota Medical School. He is also the Vice Chair of Research for the Department of Psychiatry. He is a staff physician in the Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center at the Minneapolis VA Medical Center and also serves as the Site Principal Investigator of the Minneapolis site of the Defense Veterans Brain Injury Center. Dr. Lim's research interests are in the use of advanced neuroimaging techniques to study the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders and the development of novel treatment interventions for neuropsychiatric disorders. He serves as the Minneapolis site PI for the visual sensory impairments and progression following mild traumatic brain injury study.

www.minneapolis.va.gov

The Mountain Home VA Medical Center (MHVAMC) was established in 1903 in the rolling hills of Mountain Home (Johnson City), Tennessee. It is located directly across the street from the campus of East Tennessee State University on 247 acres of land, and is also home to a U.S. National Cemetery. The MHVAMC proudly serves 54,000 Veterans from four states, including Tennessee, Virginia, Kentucky, and North Carolina. MHVAMC is a tertiary healthcare facility offering services in primary care, inpatient hospital, domiciliary, nursing home, home health, and specialty outpatient care. In addition to providing acute care in 114 hospital beds, the MHVAMC offers geriatric and rehabilitation services through its 120-bed Community Living Center, and a 170-bed Domiciliary that offers a variety of treatment options for Veterans. MHVAMC offers specialized programs including a Spinal Cord Injury clinic, programs for Health Care for Homeless and Homeless Chronically Mentally Ill Veterans, the Domiciliary Residential Rehabilitation Treatment Program, a Women's Health Clinic, an Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF)/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF)/Operation New Dawn (OND) clinic, and Polytrauma clinic. The MHVAMC currently has over 9,000 OEF/OIF/OND enrolled Veterans. The OEF/OIF/OND clinic was established in June 2007 and provides primary and specialized care to meet the unique needs of these Veterans. The Polytrauma team is led by a physiatrist and includes a clinical social worker, transitional patient advocate, and nurse care manager. The OEF/OIF/OND Clinic and Polytrauma team work closely to ensure that all OEF/OIF/OND Veterans receive appropriate comprehensive primary and specialty healthcare.

The MHVAMC has a substantial and diverse Research and Development (R&D) Program that enhances its capability to provide state-of-the-art medical care to Veterans. Currently, the medical center has 19 active principal investigators and 36 active research studies in the areas of auditory and vestibular disorders, infectious disease, cardiovascular physiology, and oncology. The premier research program at the medical center is the Auditory and Vestibular Research Enhancement Award Program (REAP) funded by VA Rehabilitation Research and Development. This program project grant supports multiple investigators to develop innovative approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of hearing and balance disorders. The Vestibular/Balance and Balance/Gait Labs within the REAP have four ongoing funded research studies including a study examining vestibular dysfunction, imbalance and traumatic brain injury in collaboration with the Chronic Effects of Neurotrauma Consortium (CENC). The labs are equipped with specialized vestibular and balance assessment equipment including: two videonystagmography systems, two infrared video eye movement recorders, two rotational chair systems, four devices for the Video Head Impulse Test (VHIT), a multichannel auditory evoked potential system, two computerized dynamic posturography systems and a portable computerized gait analysis system.

Dr. Faith Akin, Ph.D.

Faith Akin, Ph.D.

Dr. Akin is an audiologist and Director of the Vestibular/Balance Laboratory at the VA Mountain Home and Associate Professor in the Department of Audiology and Speech Language Pathology at East Tennessee State University. Dr. Akin is an expert on vestibular assessment and her research has focused on clinical assessment of otolith organ function. She is a co-investigator on the RR&D Auditory and Vestibular Dysfunction Research Enhancement Award Program (REAP) at Mountain Home VAMC.

www.mountainhome.va.gov

Dr. Courtney Hall, P.T., Ph. D.

Courtney Hall, P.T., Ph. D.

Dr. Hall is a physical therapist and was recently hired as the coordinator of the RR&D Auditory and Vestibular Dysfunction Research Enhancement Award Program (REAP) at Mountain Home VAMC. She is an Associate Professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at East Tennessee State University. She has been a physical therapist for over 20 years and has specialized in dizziness and balance problems for the past 12 years. Dr. Hall has recently completed a pilot study examining the effect of vestibular rehabilitation on dizziness in older adults. She has extensive knowledge in clinically relevant research and will be able to identify potential problems and solve them.

www.mountainhome.va.gov

Dr. Owen Murnane, Ph.D.

Owen Murnane, Ph.D.

Dr. Murnane is ACOS for Research & Development and Director of the Auditory Electrophysiology Laboratory at Mountain Home. He has collaborated with Dr. Akin for the past 13 years on vestibular research related to otolith function, and he is a co-investigator on the RR&D Auditory and Vestibular Dysfunction REAP at Mountain Home VAMC.

www.mountainhome.va.gov

Dr. Jennifer Sears, Au.D, CCC-A
Dr. Kristine Yaffe, M.D.

Kristine Yaffe, M.D.

Dr. Yaffe is the Scola Endowed Chair and Professor of Psychiatry, Neurology and Epidemiology & Biostatistics at UCSF and Chief of Geriatric Psychiatry and the Director of the Memory Evaluation Clinic at San Francisco VA Medical Center (SFVAMC). She is also the Vice Chair of Research for the UCSF Department of Psychiatry. Dr. Yaffe is an internationally recognized Geriatric Neuropsychiatrist, with expertise in predictors and outcomes of neuropsychiatric disorders in adults. Dr. Yaffe is the Vice Chair of the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on the Public Health Dimensions of Cognitive Aging and a standing member of the NIA Neuroscience of Aging Review Committee. Dr. Yaffe has had her research published in over 300 peer reviewed research articles in such prestigious journals at JAMA, BMJ, New England Journal of Medicine, Archives of General Psychiatry and Annals of Neurology. Dr. Yaffe serves as PI of the Epidemiology project and will oversee all components of the project.

www.ucsf.edu

www.sanfrancisco.va.gov

Dr. Karen H. Seal, M. D., MPH.

Karen H. Seal, M.D., MPH.

Dr. Seal is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Psychiatry at UCSF and Director of the Integrated Care Clinic for Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans at the SFVAMC. Dr. Seal published some of the first national-level studies using VA data to describe the burgeoning epidemic of mental health problems in combat Veterans accessing VA healthcare. Dr. Seal serves as Co-Investigator on the Epidemiology project and leads Aim 1.

www.ucsf.edu

www.sanfrancisco.va.gov

Dr. Fiona Crawford, Ph.D.

Fiona Crawford, Ph.D.

Dr. Crawford is a neuroscientist with 25 years of experience in neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders, with a particular focus on traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer’s disease and Gulf War illness. She is the President of the Roskamp Institute in Sarasota, Florida and a Merit funded researcher at the James A Haley Veterans’ Hospital in Tampa, Florida. Dr. Crawford directs all military research programs at the Roskamp Institute and her work encompasses genetic and biomarker research in clinical populations, and development and characterization of laboratory models, using neurobehavioral, neuropathological and biochemical approaches. All of her work has an end goal of clinical applications, therefore she collaborates extensively with researchers who work with the patient populations she seeks to treat, both in the Roskamp Institute clinic, and at the Tampa VA and other military and VA facilities around the country. At the Tampa VA she collaborates with Drs. Richardson, Vanderploeg and Belanger on translation of preclinical TBI research to human populations, while with Dr. Binder at Northwestern University she is collaborating on characterization of Tau pathogenesis in mouse models. Dr. Crawford recently extended the Roskamp military research program to include development of mouse models of PTSD. She has been consistently funded by NIH, the VA and the Department of Defense for her work, including projects on drug and biomarker discovery and translation from mouse to human populations.

www.rfdn.org

Dr. Rick Williams, Ph.D.

Rick Williams, Ph.D.

Dr. Williams is a fellow of the American Statistical Association with more than 30 years of experience in medical and epidemiological research. He has led eight major multisite research projects coordinating the efforts of dozens of research sites across the United States. He designs and leads population surveys, observational studies, and randomized clinical trials. He frequently conducts workshops and training classes on the use of statistical analysis methods for cluster-correlated, longitudinal, or repeated measures data, such as generalized estimating equations for marginal models, hierarchical linear and nonlinear mixed models, and multilevel models. He has also led the selection and implementation of data capture and data management systems for clinical studies at RTI. He holds a PhD in Biostatistics with specialization in Epidemiology.

www.rti.org

Dr. Tracy Nolen, Ph.D.

Tracy Nolen, Ph.D.

Tracy Nolen is the PI of the BDMSM core with more than 15 years of experience providing and managing analytic support for observational studies and clinical trials funded by commercial pharmaceutical and device companies, the Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Veteran Affairs, and the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Nolen specializes in the design, set-up, operation, analysis as well as scientific and regulatory reporting of clinical trials. Her statistical experience includes causal inference in observational and randomized trials settings; alternative study designs including adaptive dose finding designs and adaptive randomization algorithms; and the use of various statistical methods (e.g., regression analysis, including generalized linear models; longitudinal data analysis, including generalized estimating equation (GEE) and mixed models; survival analysis; nonparametric analysis; dose-proportionality analysis). Dr. Nolen holds a doctorate of public health in biostatistics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Gillings School of Global Public Health and a master’s degree in statistics from North Carolina State University.

www.rti.org

Gayle S. Bieler

Gayle S. Bieler

Gayle S. Bieler is a senior statistician and director of RTI International’s Center for Data Science. In this role, she leads a group of data scientists, statisticians, and predictive modelers who collaborate with RTI researchers in expanding our internal and external capabilities in data science—big data methods, data visualization, and predictive analytics. The focus of our group is to use data science to solve problems and inform decision-making across all of RTI’s research domains. As a statistician by training, Ms. Bieler is also experienced in statistical analysis of complex data from designed experiments (clinical studies, toxicology), observational studies (sample surveys, epidemiology studies), and most aspects of commercial software development. For the CENC study, Ms. Bieler designs studies, writes study protocols, and analyzes human subjects and animal data using advanced statistical methods, including predictive models, linear mixed models, and survival methods.

www.rti.org

Brenda H. Hair

Brenda H. Hair

Brenda H. Hair, a senior database administrator, has been with RTI International since 1980. She provides technical and administrative support by assisting in developing software, testing software applications, and providing technical support to end users. Ms. Hair serves as task leader for a 5-year data collection study and for the maintenance of the project Web site. She also has supervisory experience in editing and data entry processing on national surveys and serves as a group leader within the Center for Clinical Research Network Coordination, Clinical Research Coordination.

www.rti.org

Amy Stirling Kendrick

Amy Stirling Kendrick

Amy Stirling Kendrick is a clinical research manager within the Center for Clinical Research Network Coordination (CRNC). As a study manager within the Management and Operations Group, she is responsible for facilitating the centralization and standardization of safety reporting procedures across coordinating centers. In addition, she serves as the clinical research manager on studies conducted in the Chronic Effects of Neurotrauma Consortium (CENC). Ms. Kendrick has a Bachelor’s degree in Nursing, a Master’s degree in Pediatric Nursing, and then a Post-master’s degree in Clinical Research Management. Her patient care experience ranged from outpatient to inpatient and then to Intensive Care Unit (ICU) settings. Her research experience has spanned from hospital site coordinator, to Clinical Research Office (CRO) coordinator and pharmacovigilance specialist, ultimately becoming project director of a coordinating center performing government-funded research on infectious disease and autoimmune disorders. Before joining RTI, she served for 6 years, as the clinical research manager of an Evidence Synthesis Group (ESG), which included an Evidence-based Practice Center (EPC), at Duke University. In that capacity, she managed between five to fifteen employees, working among a group of more than seventy investigators.

www.rti.org

Russ Vandermaas-Peeler

Russ Vandermaas-Peeler

Russ Vandermaas-Peeler, a health policy analyst, worked at RTI from 1989 to 1991 and returned in 1996. He has 20 years of research management, including research study and instrument design, IRB documentation, data collection management, data analysis and reporting. Mr. Vandermaas-Peeler has extensive experience managing data collection efforts for large military studies, using multiple modes and methodologies.

www.rti.org

Callie Riggs

Callie Riggs

Callie Riggs joined RTI International in 2006 as a financial analyst. She transitioned to the role of project management specialist in 2007. In this role, Ms. Riggs has managed the contractual, administrative, and fiscal affairs for an international multisite research project, several small international projects, and several national multisite projects. Ms. Riggs assisted with the development of the capitation payment system for a large research project, and she is knowledgeable about making capitation payments in a multisite, multiple protocol project. She has previous experience developing proposal budgets for a variety of contract types at RTI. Ms. Riggs is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP) and also has experience with program administration, cost accounting, contract management, and financial reporting.

www.rti.org

Douglas W. Theriaque

Douglas W. Theriaque

Douglas W. Theriaque is a research programmer/analyst with more than 18 years of experience in biomedical informatics. With a background in both information technology (IT) and statistics, Mr. Theriaque has expertise in Web-based application development using open-source tools, database development, data management, and programming methodologies. In addition to his work with electronic data capture (EDC) systems, he has extensive experience in developing and implementing data validation and data quality control plans, and managing data entry staff and related data acquisition activities. He is a capable statistical programmer, having productively collaborated with researchers on projects that span numerous disciplines. As an educator and mentor Mr. Theriaque has provided both hands-on and didactic instruction in the design of EDC systems and data management best practices. He is knowledgeable in Good Clinical Practice and health information privacy (HIPAA) guidelines and has served on numerous scientific advisory committees for center-sponsored projects and U.S. Food and Drug Administration–regulated clinical trials.

www.rti.org

Shawn Hirsch

Shawn Hirsch

Shawn Hirsch is a research statistician with more than 6 years of experience; 2 with RTI International’s Center for Clinical Research Network Coordination (CRNC). In this capacity, he works with a multidisciplinary team to design, implement, manage, and analyze observational studies and multisite randomized clinical trials. His specific job duties include, but are not limited to: developing data safety reports, creating edit checks and other data quality reports, performing data manipulations and statistical analyses, and collaborating with investigators to prepare manuscripts. Mr. Hirsch has a diverse portfolio of experience in a variety of research topics including traumatic brain injury, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), cancer, HIV/AIDS, and environmental health. His statistical skills include sensitivity and specificity calculations; regression analysis; survival analysis; and longitudinal data analysis. He is well versed in SAS, has a working knowledge of R, and has 2 years of project management experience. Mr. Hirsch holds a master’s degree in Biostatistics and Epidemiology from the University of South Florida.

www.rti.org

Dr. Gerald York, M.D.

Gerald York, M.D.

Lt. Col. Gerry York is a radiologist who was trained in neuroradiology and has experience in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fMRI research. He is the associate program director for research for San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium Radiology and is chief of MRI at Brooke Army Medical Center. He has been instrumental in helping Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) establish a research consortium with University of Texas Health Science Center and Baylor Medical College.

www.dvbic.dcoe.mil

The San Francisco VA Medical Center (SFVAMC), founded in 1934, is part of a comprehensive network that provides health services to Veterans across a large geographic area ranging from the San Francisco Bay Area to Nevada to the California-Oregon border, including six community-based outpatient clinics. SFVAMC has 124 operating beds and a 120-bed Community Living Center, provides a wide variety of primary care outpatient clinics, and contains state of the art polytrauma and surgical units, including National Centers of Excellence in the areas of Epilepsy Treatment; Cardiac Surgery; Post Traumatic Stress Disorder; HIV; and Renal Dialysis. Research is also a key aspect of the VA Medical Service; SFVAMC has the largest funded research program in the Veterans Health Administration with $90.2 million in research expenditures. The SFVAMC is playing a leading role in the UCSF Clinical and Translational Research Institute, an ambitious NIH effort to stimulate the translation of basic scientific findings to improve individual and population health. Additionally, SFVAMC has established a unique partnership with the Department of Defense (DoD) to study the basic neuroscience and neuroimaging of combat-related traumatic brain and spinal cord injuries, PTSD and other neurological combat-related injuries and predictors of injuries of war fighters. The DoD considers this program a national resource in the coordinated effort to address the long-term effects of combat-related and military-relevant TBI and its diagnosis and treatment. The CENC staff at SFVAMC is comprised of physicians, neurologists, psychologists, epidemiologists, biostatisticians, statistical programmers, data managers and research assistants. The team has unique access to the SFVAMC's medical facilities and expert clinical research staff and faculty.

Dr. Amy L. Byers, Ph.D., MPH

Amy L. Byers, Ph.D., MPH

Dr. Byers is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at UCSF and a Research PI at the SFVAMC. She is a clinical epidemiologist with expertise in the study of mental health disorders in older adults, and in the use of large datasets. Her research focuses on the epidemiology of late-life mental health—using advanced epidemiological and biostatistical techniques to determine the prevalence, risk factors, and outcomes of late-life mental health disorders, with the aim of reducing the burden of these disorders by informing long-term clinical care. Dr. Byers has been heavily involved in research to determine nationally representative estimates of psychiatric disorders and health care utilization among older community-dwelling adults. Dr. Byers has had her research published in several prestigious journals including the New England Journal of Medicine, Archives of Internal Medicine, and Archives of General Psychiatry. Dr. Byers serves as Co-Investigator and co-lead the Epidemiology Project Aim 2 along with Dr. Barnes.

www.ucsf.edu

www.sanfrancisco.va.gov

Dr. Deborah E. Barnes, Ph.D., MPH

Deborah E. Barnes, Ph.D., MPH

Dr. Barnes is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Epidemiology & Biostatistics at UCSF and Research PI at the SFVAMC. Her research focuses on identifying and evaluating risk factors for cognitive impairment and dementia in older adults and examining potential strategies to maintain cognitive function with age. She also works to develop dementia risk prediction models that can be used to estimate the impact of risk factor reduction and to target prevention strategies toward those who are at greatest risk. Dr. Barnes' has published numerous observational studies related to identification of factors associated with risk of cognitive decline and dementia, including on the potential protective effects of physical and mental activity as well as the complex relationship between depression and cognitive impairment. Dr. Barnes serves as Co-Investigator on Epidemiology Project and co-leads Aim 2 along with Dr. Byers.

www.ucsf.edu

www.sanfrancisco.va.gov

Dr. W. John Bascardin, Ph.D., MPH

W. John Bascardin, Ph.D., MPH

Dr. Boscardin is a Professor of Medicine and Biostatistics at UCSF and Research PI at the SFVAMC. His areas of methodological expertise include analysis of longitudinal and repeated measures data, treatment of missing data, Bayesian statistical modeling, and computational statistics. He has worked in a wide range of substantive areas including HIV/AIDS, brain injury, health disparities, diabetes, stroke, ageing and frailty, and scleroderma, with colleagues in a wide variety of disciplines, including geriatrics, psychology, psychiatry, pediatrics, ophthalmology, immunology, virology, gastroenterology, epidemiology, neuroimaging, neurosurgery, neuroscience, cardiology, health services, and rheumatism. Dr. Boscardin will serve as Co-Investigator on the project and serves as the project’s Senior biostatistician and will work closely with the CENC Biostatistics Core.

www.ucsf.edu

www.sanfrancisco.va.gov

The South Texas Veterans Health Care System (STVHCS) is comprised of the Audie L. Murphy Division (ALMD), the Kerrville Division, and the Satellite Clinic Division. The ALMD Hospital (San Antonio VAMC) is a 268 bed facility providing primary, secondary, and tertiary health care in medicine, surgery, psychiatry, and rehabilitation medicine. It also supports a 90 bed Extended Care Therapy Center, a 30-bed Spinal Cord Injury Center, an eight-bed Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, and a Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center. The ALMD Hospital Campus is also the home of a Level One Polytrauma Rehabilitation Center. The STVHCS serves a population of approximately 300,000 veterans residing in the region stretching from San Antonio in Central Texas south and westward. The system has an active ambulatory care program with satellite outpatient clinics throughout San Antonio and in Victoria.

The San Antonio Polytrauma System of Care (SA-PSC) encompasses a continuum of care for veterans and active duty service members with traumatic brain injury and other polytraumatic injuries. This continuum of care includes the Polytrauma Rehabilitation Center (PRC) inpatient rehabilitation unit, Polytrauma Transitional Rehabilitation Program (PTRP) and the Polytrauma Network Site (PNS) outpatient clinics. The SA-PSC has extensive clinical and research ties with the San Antonio Military Medical Center (SAMMC) and the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC).

The STVHCS's primary academic affiliate is the UT Health Science Center San Antonio. All of STVHCS's interdisciplinary team of core investigators have academic appointments at the UT Health Science Center San Antonio. The main campus of the UT Health Science Center at San Antonio is adjacent to the ALMD Hospital where the investigators are housed. The UT Health Science Center San Antonio serves the metropolitan area of San Antonio and the 50,000 square-mile area of South Texas. It extends to campuses in the metropolitan border communities of Laredo and the Rio Grande Valley The CENC staff at the San Antonio Polytrauma Center is comprised of physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians, program coordinators, neurologists, clinical psychologists, research psychologists and research assistants. The CENC team has regular access to Polytrauma experts, an Epilepsy Center of Excellence and STVHCS Health Services Researchers.

Dr. Blessen Eapen, M.D.

Blessen Eapen, M.D.

Dr. Eapen is the Section Chief for the Polytrauma Rehabilitation Center (PRC) and Director of the PRC Emerging Consciousness Program at South Texas Veteran’s Health Care System. He is board certified in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and is subspecialty fellowship trained in Traumatic Brain Injury/Polytrauma Rehabilitation and is Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio. He is Co-Principal Investigator with the Consortium to Alleviate PTSD (CAP) to study Post-traumatic Headache interventions.

rehab.uthscsa.edu

Dr. Carlos Jaramillo, M.D., Ph.D.

Carlos Jaramillo, M.D., Ph.D.

Dr. Jaramillo is a Staff Physician and Researcher in the Polytrauma Rehabilitation Center, South Texas Veterans Health Care System (STVHCS) and Affiliated Investigator, Geriatrics Research, Education and Clinical Center, STVHCS. He is a Hartford Research Scholar in Geriatric Medicine, through the John A. Hartford Foundation and Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio.

rehab.uthscsa.edu

Dr. Mary Jo Pugh, Ph.D.

The Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU), a health science university run by the U.S. federal government with a primary purpose to prepare graduates for service to the U.S. at home and abroad in the medical corps, was established by Congress in 1972 as part of the Uniformed Services Health Professions Revitalization Act. It was created to fill a void that existed in hospitals and clinics, on bases and battlefields, and other places where service members needed specially trained physicians to care for their wounds.

USU is located in Bethesda, Maryland, on the grounds of the Naval Support Activity-Bethesda, alongside the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center directly across the street from the National Institutes of Health. The physical proximity of these three world-class institutions creates a globally-unique academic health center of extraordinary depth, breadth and impact.

USU's Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) was established in 1962. AFRRI provides response teams for radiation-related events and conducts research to prevent or mitigate the effects of ionizing radiation and is charged with executing DoD's Medical Radiological Defense Research Program. Core areas of study include prevention, assessment, and treatment of radiological injuries.

USU is responsible on behalf of DOD for fiscal management as well as coordinating the establishment and operation of the Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine (CNRM) which was established as a collaborative intramural federal program involving the DOD and the NIH developed to bring together the expertise of clinicians and scientists across disciplines to catalyze innovative approaches to traumatic brain injury (TBI) research.

The CNRM Research Programs have an emphasis on aspects of high relevance to the military populations, with a primary focus on patients at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. CNRM Research Programs address the full spectrum of TBI with special focus on militarily relevant forms of TBI such as blast, penetrating, and repeat neurotrauma events, including the effect of high anxiety and concurrent development of PTSD with TBI. The CNRM's Clinical Research Studies focus on improving the diagnosis and care of TBIs for both military service members and civilians. The CNRM's Brain Tissue Repository was established to give scientists and physicians a better understanding and more innovative approaches to better care for our military personnel after a head injury.

Dr. Brian Cox, M.D.

Brian Cox, M.D.

Dr. Cox is the Principal Investigator of the Chronic Effects of Neurotrauma Consortium Biorepository Core. Dr. Cox is currently Professor of Pharmacology and Neuroscience at the Uniformed Services University (USUHS) in Bethesda. He leads the Clinical Biomarkers Group for the Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine, evaluating neurochemical mechanisms underlying traumatic brain injury and potential biomarkers for TBI. For most of his career Dr. Cox's research has focused on characterizing the receptors used by opiate drugs and their endogenous ligands, and in defining potential physiological and pathophysiological roles for endogenous opioids and other neuropeptides. Dr. Cox has served on the editorial boards of several journals. He was elected Secretary of the International Narcotics Research Conference for 1994-1998, and President of the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics for 2009-2010. He is also a member of the Board of Directors of the Federation of American Societies of Experimental Biology (FASEB).

www.usuhs.edu

Dr. Kimbra Kenney, M.D.

Kimbra Kenney, M.D.

Dr Kenney the Medical Officer at the Henry M Jackson Foundation in Bethesda, working as part of the TBI research program at USUHS, and is an Attending Physician in TBI inpatient and outpatient Service at the WRNMMC. Her research interests have focused on the diagnosis and treatment of clinical neurological conditions, such as diagnostic markers of TBI using novel portable devices, the treatment interventions and biomarkers of treatment efficacy of TBI and the prevalence, clinicopathological correlates and markers of dementias associated with remote TBI. Dr Kenney is serving as co-leader for the Biomarker core.

www.usuhs.edu

Dr. Dan Perl, M.D.

Dan Perl, M.D.

Dr. Perl is a senior neuropathologist with extensive experience and expertise in designing and running brain banks. He directed the Brain Bank/Neuropathology Core of the Mount Sinai/Bronx VA Medical Center ADRC. He also ran the brain banks within the Jewish Home for the Aged study and the ALS/Parkinsonism-dementia Complex of Guam Brain Bank Core. Currently, he directs the CNRM Neuropathology Core.

www.usuhs.edu

Henry Lew, M.D., Ph.D.

Henry Lew, M.D., Ph.D.

The University of Minnesota health sciences combines to form one of the largest, most comprehensive academic health centers in the nation. The Academic Health Center at the University of Minnesota is home to six colleges and schools, more than 90 centers and institutes, and hospitals and clinics, including a partnership with University of Minnesota Health. The Health Center is one of more than 100 members of the Association for Academic Health Centers nationwide. The Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) focuses on development of unique magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and spectroscopy methodologies and instrumentation for the acquisition of structural, functional, and biochemical information non-invasively in humans, and utilizing this capability to investigate organ function in health and disease.

The distinctive feature of this center is the emphasis on ultrahigh magnetic fields. CMRR is home to some of the most advanced MR instrumentation in the world, complemented by human resources that provide unique expertise in imaging physics, engineering, and signal processing. Equipment includes:

  • 7.0 Siemens TIM ultrahigh field human head-only MRI with 32 RF channel capability
  • 4.0 T Oxford magnet with Varian Inova console
  • 3 T Siemens TIM Trio whole body clinical MRI
  • 9.4 Tesla Magnex Scientific 31 cm bore
  • 9.4 Tesla Magnex Scientific Limited 65 cm bore
  • 4.7 Telsa Oxford 40 cm
  • 248-channel Magnes 3600 WH MEG system

Collectively, the approaches and instrumentation developed in CMRR constitute some of the most important tools used today to study system level organ function and physiology in humans for basic and translational research, and are increasingly applied world-wide.

The University of Minnesota, Department of Psychiatry collaborates with CMRR and BSC and provides a complete clinical infrastructure.

The CENC team at UMN/CMRR is comprised of a unique group of scientists with multi-disciplinary capabilities as well as physicians, pharmacists, nurses and dentists.

Dr. Seung Suk Kang

Seung Suk Kang

 

www.twin-cities.umn.edu

Dr. Scott R. Sponheim, Ph.D.

Scott R. Sponheim, Ph.D.

 

www.twin-cities.umn.edu

Dr. David Tate, Ph.D.

David Tate, Ph.D.

Dr. Tate is a clinical neuropsychologist with extensive experience conducting medical imaging research in the context of neurologic disease and injury. He has been involved in several large multi-site funded studies of developmental disorders, Alzheimer's disease, cardiovascular disease, and traumatic brain injury. He was also co-investigator and co-director of the structural imaging core for the HIV Neuroimaging Consortium which was a large NIH/NIMH funded multi-site study examining the effects of HIV infection on cognitive and neuroimaging measures. Involvement in these various studies has resulted in significant experience and training in MRI methods, statistical procedures, and applications that are conducive to study of traumatic brain injury. Currently, he is the recipient of a CDMRP grant examining the treatment effects of cognitive rehabilitation therapies in symptomatic mild traumatic brain injured DoD Service members at the San Antonio Military Medical Center.

www.umsl.edu

Established in 1830, The University of Richmond (UR) is one of America's premier private, highly selective, independent liberal arts universities, with a rising national and international profile. Richmond is situated on a 350-acre suburban campus six miles from downtown Richmond. It has a total enrollment of approximately 4000 in five schools: Arts and Sciences, Leadership Studies, Business, Law, and Professional and Continuing Studies. This total includes about 3200 undergraduates as well as about 800 students in masters and law programs.

The UR Department of Mathematics and Computer Science's 17 faculty members regularly weave their research programs with educating undergraduates by combining standard course material with examples from their research, as well as engaging students as lab assistants, collaborators, co-authors, and co-presenters at national conferences. In the sciences, Richmond was awarded 2004, 2008, and 2012 Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Undergraduate Science Education grants, one that enabled the integration of all five science majors into a new two-semester introductory "supercourse," Integrated Quantitative Science (IQS). This course incorporates topics from biology, chemistry, physics, math, and computer science and is developed and taught by professors from all five disciplines. The most recent HHMI grant of $1.4 million funds the four-year URISE program (UR Integrated Science Experience), designed to promote diversity in math and science by engaging pre-college students currently underrepresented in the sciences in interdisciplinary math/science summer courses. The University of Richmond data analysis and mathematical modeling collaboration consists of Dr. Kathy Hoke and Dr. Joanna Wares, mathematicians, Dr. Lewis Barnett, computer scientist, and Dr. Paul Kvam, statistician.

Dr. Kathy Hoke, Ph.D.

Kathy Hoke, Ph.D.

Dr. Hoke is currently a Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science at the University of Richmond. She received her Ph.D. in Mathematics from the University of North Carolina and her research for the consortium involves analyzing eye tracking and posturography data to characterize the effects of mTBI. Dr Hoke is serving as principle investigator.

www.richmond.edu/

The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio is an institute of health science education and research located in the South Texas Medical Center, the medical district of San Antonio, Texas. It is a component of the University of Texas System and is the largest health sciences university in South Texas. The Health Science Center serves San Antonio and all of the 50,000 square mile (130,000 km²) area of Central and South Texas. It has produced more than 28,000 graduates; more than 3,000 students a year train in an environment that involves more than 100 affiliated hospitals, clinics, and health care facilities in South Texas. Dr. Mary Jo Pugh is affiliated with the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and leads a sizeable team in epidemiology and health services research.

Dr. Mary Jo Pugh, Ph.D.

The University of Washington (UW) is a public university founded in 1861 and located in Seattle, Washington. The university has three campuses (Seattle, Tacoma and Bothell) and an operating budget of over $6B per year. The UW occupies over 500 buildings with major research space dedicated to neuroscience research, training and clinical care at UW Medical Center, Harborview Medical Center (HMC) and the UW Medicine Institute of Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine amongst other collaborating institutions. UW collaborates with the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and Seattle Children's Hospital for both clinical care and research. UW has 50,000 students including 4,500 School of Medicine students/trainees and is listed as a top 25 world university in several global ranking surveys.

Faculty honors include: Six Nobel Prize winners, 15 MacArthur Fellows, 81 Members of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, 162 Fellows in the AAAS, 150+ Members of the Institute of Medicine and the National Academies.

The University has 4,981 active grants and receives $1.3B in sponsored grants and contracts and is the number 1 public university in receipt of federal research support (number 2 overall). Harborview Medical Center is the Level 1 trauma center for a five state region that comprises ¼ of the land mass of the continental United States. Harborview is a 413 bed hospital with 4500 employees.

Neurological Surgery covers the entire spectrum of pediatric and adult Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) from concussion to severe cases. All severe TBI patients with poly-trauma are brought to HMC either directly or by referral from outlying hospitals. HMC is the busiest Neurotrauma referral center in the 5-state region. Neurological Surgery is directly involved in clinical management of all of these patients including over 700 major TBI surgeries a year. Thirty of Harborview's 86 ICU beds are reserved for neuro patients. Research projects include NIH, DOD, and Private Foundation funding to study adult and pediatric trauma, youth sports concussion, Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder amongst blast injured veterans, neuroprotection, TBI imaging and biomarkers, development of adult and pediatric treatment guidelines (including in the Global Health context of low and middle income countries), and post traumatic epilepsy models and care. Neurological Surgery holds the Integra Endowed Chair in Neurotrauma. Neurological Surgery also hosts and Co-Directs the UW Medicine Neurosciences Institute as well as the newly formed UW Medicine Sports Health and Safety Institute.

Dr. Sureyya Dikmen, Ph.D.

Sureyya Dikmen, Ph.D.

Sureyya S. Dikmen, Ph.D. is a professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and Adjunct Professor of Neurological Surgery,&Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington. She has devoted her career as a neuropsychologist to the study of TBI with emphasis on the natural history of recovery, prediction of outcome and randomized clinical trials to reduce the negative impacts of these injuries. The clinical interventions have included neuroprotection trials, prophylaxis trials for prevention of seizures, and psychological interventions. She has been on multiple TBI expert working groups, scientific advisory boards and data and safety monitoring boards for CDC, NINDS, NIDRR, the Brain Injury Association of America, and Institute of Medicine.

www.neurosurgery.washington.edu

Dr. Christine Mac Donald, Ph.D.

Christine Mac Donald, Ph.D.

Dr. Mac Donald is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Neurological Surgery at University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle, Washington. She is the Principal Investigator of the "Assessment of long term outcome & Disability in Active-duty military Prospectively examined following concussive TBI" - ADAPT Study. She has previously been the Director of many prospective, observational research studies with Active-Duty US Military completed in Afghanistan, Germany and in the United States. She has particular expertise in neuroimaging, traumatic brain injury, clinical research, project management, clinical trials for medical imaging devices, medical diagnostics, and experimental models of brain injury.

www.neurosurgery.washington.edu

Dr. Nancy Temkin, Ph.D.

Nancy Temkin, Ph.D.

For the past 35 years, Dr. Temkin’s career has focused on understanding outcomes from TBI and evaluating interventions to improve outcomes. She has a PhD in Statistics and a joint appointment in Neurological Surgery and Biostatistics at the University of Washington, teaching statistical consulting each year in the top-rated Biostatistics program in the country. Dr. Temkin has been the biostatistician and PI for the data center for 4 federally-funded multicenter clinical trials (Effects of Scheduled Telephone Intervention on Outcomes after Traumatic Brain Injury [2004-2009], Traumatic Brain Injury in Latin America: Lifespan Analysis [BEST-TRIP, 2007-2012], Controlled Trial of Venlafaxine XR for Major Depression Following Spinal Cord Injury: A Multi-Site Study[2007-date], Phase II, randomized controlled trial of brain tissue oxygen monitoring [BOOST-II, 2009-date], and numerous observational studies and single-site trials.

www.neurosurgery.washington.edu

The VA Boston Healthcare System (VABHS), which was formed in 2000, is the product of a series of integrations involving four formerly independent medical centers. VA Boston includes three main campus divisions. Each of these is located within 40 miles of Boston. These campus divisions include Jamaica Plain, located in the heart of Boston's Longwood Medical Community; West Roxbury, located about 10 miles west of downtown Boston; and Brockton, located 20 miles south of Boston in the City of Brockton. It collectively serves more than 63,000 veterans yearly. VA Boston provides a full range of services, with state-of-the-art technology as well as education and research, offering specialized training to over 1,200 Medical Residents and fellows, 250 medical students, 670 nursing students, and 500 students in psychology, optometry, pharmacy, and other allied health professions. VA Boston Healthcare System is the largest recipient of VA research funds in the nation and has strong affiliations with Harvard Medical School and Boston University School of Medicine as well as with Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston Medical Center, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, and Spaulding Rehabilitation Center. VA Boston has been a leader in the study of traumatic brain injury and neurodegeneration, participating actively in the development of the Department of Veterans Affairs Biorepository Brain Bank (VABBB), Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses Biorepository Brain Bank (GWVIB), and the VA PSTD Brain Bank. The CENC staff, lead by Dr. Ann McKee, are pioneers in research focusing on the long-term effects of concussive and blast neurotrauma and have written landmark publications on chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in athletes and veterans alike. The CENC staff at the VA Boston is comprised of pathologists, neurologists, clinical psychologists, postdoctoral researchers, histologists, program coordinators, and research assistants. The CENC team laboratory consists to 2500 square footage of recently renovated wet lab space at the VA Boston and includes access to Aperio ScanScope, X-Clarity tissue clarification system, and access to computing and imaging analysis software.

Katelyn Gormley, MPH

Katelyn Gormley, MPH

Katelyn Gormley, MPH is a Project Manager at VA Boston Healthcare System. She received her Master of Public Health in Social and Behavioral Sciences from Boston University School of Public Health. Ms. Gormley has extensive experience in study management, recruitment, and data collection. She will serve as the study coordinator for the CENC Study 1 at VA Boston.

www.boston.va.gov

Terri K. Pogoda, Ph.D.

Terri K. Pogoda, Ph.D.

Terri K. Pogoda, PhD is an experimental psychologist and a Core Investigator at the VA Health Services Research & Development Center of Innovation located at the VA Boston Healthcare System. She is also a Research Assistant Professor of Health Law, Policy & Management at the Boston University School of Public Health. As a VA health services researcher, her research examines post-deployment physical and psychological health and readjustment to civilian life (especially employment) among OEF/OIF/OND Veterans diagnosed with traumatic brain injury (TBI), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and other conditions. Her research also focuses on integration and coordination of health care teams, identifying best practices for health care, and implementing evidence-based practices to meet the healthcare and psychosocial needs of Veterans.

www.boston.va.gov

Dr. Ann McKee, M.D.

Ann McKee, M.D.

 

www.boston.va.gov

The VA Portland Health Care System (VAPORHCS) is a teaching hospital within the VA Northwest Health Network 20. It is located on a 28.5 acre-campus with 303 beds and provides ongoing care to 60,000 Veterans treated in five primary care clinics, three in metropolitan areas and two Community-based Outpatient Clinics in rural areas. VAPORHCS has received Magnet Designation, recognizing nationally superior patient care, every year since 2006. The VAPORHCS provides a full range of patient care services through primary care, tertiary care, and long-term care in areas of medicine, surgery, psychiatry, physical medicine and rehabilitation, neurology, oncology, post-deployment health, dentistry, geriatrics, and extended care. In addition to providing a full range of patient care services, the VAPORHCS currently has 172 funded research investigators (including 7 Research Career Scientists and 17 Career Development Awardees), 535 active research protocols, and a research budget in 2014 that exceeded $33 million in direct costs ($15.3 million from VA, $12.6 million from NIH, and the remainder from foundations, industry, and other support). It currently ranks in the top 10 nationwide among VA Health Care Systems in grant support from the Department of Veterans Affairs. The VAPORHCS Research Service operates approximately 93,000 square feet of wet and dry lab space, supporting programs in epidemiology, auditory research, health services research, clinical research, outcomes research, basic science, and cooperative studies. It houses 12 national research centers, including the National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research (NCRAR) and the Center to Improve Veteran Involvement in Care (CIVIC), where Portland CENC staff are housed. The NCRAR is the only Center of Excellence funded by VA Rehabilitation Research and Development Service that is dedicated to addressing the needs of Veterans with auditory-system impairments. The NCRAR is equipped to conduct all types of clinical auditory research; facilities include 10 double-walled sound booths, an anechoic test chamber, developmental laboratories, a vestibular laboratory, conference rooms, and multiple staff offices. The CIVIC is a VA Health Services Research and Development Center of Innovation dedicated to the conduct of research that empowers Veterans to improve their health by enhancing active participation of Veterans and their support systems in health care. CIVIC researchers have a long history of studying post-deployment health and mental and physical health comorbidities, including mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Dr. Kathleen Carlson, MS, Ph.D.

Kathleen Carlson, MS, Ph.D.

Kathleen Carlson, M.S., Ph.D. is a Core Investigator in the Portland VA Health Services Research and Development (HSR&D) Center of Innovation (COIN) and an Assistant Professor of Epidemiology in the School of Public Health at Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU). Dr. Carlson is an environmental epidemiologist whose doctoral training specialized in the measurement of exposures and outcomes related to injury. She has worked in VA health services research since 2006, when she began an HSR&D postdoctoral fellowship with the Polytrauma & Blast-related Injuries QUERI (Quality Enhancement Research Initiative) at the Minneapolis VA HSR&D Center of Innovation. Her research has focused on the prevention of injury and on improving psychosocial outcomes of Veterans with traumatic brain injury (TBI), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and other co-morbid post-deployment health conditions.

www.portland.va.gov

Cody Blankenship, B.S.

Cody Blankenship, B.S.

Cody Blankenship, B.S. received her Bachelors of Science in Community Health from Western Oregon University. She is the Study Coordinator for the CENC Study 1 VA Portland Health Care System site. Ms. Blankenship has been involved in the coordination of multiple grant proposals and has extensive experience with Veteran outreach, recruitment, and study management and administration. Since 2014, she has served as the Program Manager for the Noise Outcomes In Service members Epidemiology (NOISE) Study, which includes overseeing the two study sites in Portland and San Antonio, Texas.

www.portland.va.gov

Dr. James Henry, Ph.D.

James Henry, Ph.D.

James Henry, Ph.D. is a certified and licensed audiologist with a doctorate in Behavioral Neuroscience. He is employed at the National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research (NCRAR) located at the VA Portland Health Care System. He is also Research Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery at Oregon Health & Science University. For the past 20 years, Dr. Henry has devoted his career to tinnitus research, receiving funding for 25 grants to study various aspects of tinnitus clinical management. He has led the effort to develop Progressive Tinnitus Management (PTM), which is endorsed by VA Central Office as the standard method of tinnitus management for VA hospitals. Since 2010, his research has included studies to address tinnitus among individuals who have experienced traumatic brain injury (TBI).

www.portland.va.gov

In 1969, ground was broken for a new Veterans Administration Hospital in San Diego on 26 acres of what was once Camp Calvin B. Matthews, a Marine Corps rifle range. San Diego VA Medical Center opened in 1972 and the VA San Diego Healthcare System (VASDHS) now provides service to more than 230,261 Veterans in the San Diego and Imperial Valley counties with one of the highest percentages of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans. In addition to the main facility in La Jolla, there are also six community-based outpatient clinics. VASDHS provides medical, surgical, mental health, geriatric, spinal cord injury, and advanced rehabilitation services. VASDHS has 304 authorized beds, including skilled nursing beds and operates several regional referral programs including cardiovascular surgery and spinal cord injury. The VASDHS is affiliated with the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and provides training for 1,507 medical interns, residents and fellows, as well as 910 other clinical trainees in psychology, nursing, pharmacy, dental, and dietetics. VASDHS has one of the largest research programs in the VA nationally with a budget of $44.3 million (FY 2014), 217 principal investigators, and 586 projects. The CENC staff at the VASDHS is comprised of neuropsychologists, research psychologists, and research assistants. The CENC team has regular access to polytrauma experts, the VISN 22 Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health (CESAMH), a state of the art telehealth program, and the Aspire Center, a 40-bed residential mental health rehabilitation and recovery treatment facility targeting PTSD and TBI in Veterans who are returning from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Dr. Amy Jak, Ph.D.

Amy Jak, Ph.D.

Dr. Jak is a clinical neuropsychologist with extensive treatment and research experience with TBI and cognitive aging/dementia. She is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at UCSD and a Staff Neuropsychologist and Director of the TBI Cognitive Rehabilitation Clinic at the VA San Diego Healthcare System. She is also a member of the VISN 22 Center of Excellence for Stress and Mental Health. She is currently the PI of a CDMRP-funded randomized trial investigating a hybrid treatment for Veterans with both PTSD and a history of mild TBI and her work has been funded by VA, DoD, NIH, and/or the Alzheimer's Association since 2007. She is a fellow of Division 40 of the APA, serves on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, and has published over 60 peer-reviewed articles.

www.sandiego.va.gov

Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) is one of the nation's premier urban, public research universities with over 30,000 students. VCU was established in 1838, as the former Medical Department of the Hampden-Sydney College, located in the 'Egyptian Building' on what is now the grounds of the current VCU hospital. The School of Medicine at VCU boasts a reputation for excellence in teaching, research and health care, providing care to patients from across Virginia as well as neighboring states. It is the largest single provider of indigent health care in the Commonwealth, and as the region's only Level 1 Trauma Center it is recognized internationally for organ transplantation care, head and spinal cord trauma, burn healing, and cancer treatment. Within the School of Medicine, the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (PM&R) was established in 1947 and currently provides medical directorship to three adult inpatient rehabilitation units, one adult subacute rehabilitation unit, two pediatric rehabilitation units, five outpatient clinics, electrodiagnostic services at four outpatient locations, and consultations at three Richmond hospitals and four nursing homes. The department also provides PM&R leadership to the nation's premier VA programs in areas including polytrauma, TBI, and interventional pain/spine care. In 2013 Dr. David X. Cifu, Chair of the Department of PM&R was awarded a combined DoD/VA five-year award of $62.3 million. Four current sites are now operational with other sites planned in the near future. As Director of the Chronic Effects of Neurotrauma Consortium (CENC), Dr. Cifu and his team of laboratory neurotrauma scientists, fiscal specialists, senior project coordinators, military recruitment specialists, and executive administrators coordinate the overarching strategic goals of CENC as well as its day-to-day operation.

Dr. David Cifu, M.D.

David Cifu, M.D.

Dr. Cifu is the Principal Investigator of the Chronic Effects of Neurotrauma Consortium. David is also the Herman J. Flax, M.D. Professor of the Department of PM&R at the Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) School of Medicine in Richmond, Virginia. In his 20 years as an academic physiatrist, he has delivered more than 425 regional, national and international lectures, published more than 165 articles and 65 abstracts, and co-authored 20 books and book chapters. He is also the Past President of the American Academy of PM&R.

www.pmr.vcu.edu

Justin Alicea

Justin Alicea, CCRP

Mr. Alicea is the Co-Director of the CENC Coordinating Center. He received his Bachelor of Science degree in Physiological Psychology from the City University of New York and is a Society of Clinical Research Coordinators (SOCRA) Certified Clinical Research Professional. His research interests include PTSD and mTBI treatments for active duty military and veterans.

www.pmr.vcu.edu

Dr. William Carne, Ph.D.

William Carne, Ph.D.

William Carne, Ph.D. is the Research Coordinator for the CENC. Dr. Carne is an Associate Professor in PM&R at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in Richmond, Virginia. He is a licensed clinical psychologist with 33 years of direct patient care experience and research and has over two dozen peer reviewed manuscripts published.

www.pmr.vcu.edu

Kevin Sickinger

Kevin Sickinger

LTC (Retired) Kevin Sickinger has been the CENC Director of Recruiting and Retention since August 2015. Prior to arriving at CENC, LTC Sickinger served for 23 years in the US Army, is a combat decorated veteran, and served in a variety of leadership and command roles. After the initial success in recruiting and retention, he has now also taken on the role of Co-Director of the CENC Coordinating Center located at Virginia Commonwealth University.

www.pmr.vcu.edu

Dr. Joel Steinberg, M.D.

Joel Steinberg, M.D.

 

www.pmr.vcu.edu

Dr. William Walker, M.D.

William Walker, M.D.

William Walker, M.D. is the CENC Study 1 Observational Study on Late Neurologic Effects of OEF/OIF/OND Combat Principal Investigator and Researcher for the CENC. Dr. Walker is also the Ernst and Helga Prosser Professor and Vice Chairman of Clinical Care in PM&R at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in Richmond, Virginia. Dr. Walker is board-certified in PM&R with 20 years’ experience performing clinical care and research with TBI and has over 50 peer reviewed manuscripts published.

www.pmr.vcu.edu

Christie Atkins

Christie Atkins

Ms. Atkins is the Grant Administrator of the CENC Coordinating Center. She is the Finance Manager in VCU Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and manages all budgetary, administrative and contractual aspects of the department’s research programs. Ms. Atkins has over ten years’ experience in pre- and post-award sponsored research and budget administration.

www.pmr.vcu.edu

Amma Agyemang, PhD, MPH

Amma Agyemang, PhD, MPH

 

www.pmr.vcu.edu

The W.G. (Bill) Hefner VA Medical Center (Salisbury VAMC) opened its doors for patient care in 1953. The main hospital encompasses over 1.2 million square feet of building space on 155 acres. Salisbury's primary service area includes approximately 287,000 Veterans, covering a 24 county area of North Carolina's Central Piedmont Region; this facility is designated a rural VAMC. Inpatient services include acute medicine, cardiology, surgery, psychiatry and physical medicine and rehabilitation, as well as sub-acute and extended care. Primary and specialized outpatient services are provided at the medical center complex and the Community Based Outpatient Clinics. As of the end of 2015, Salisbury VAMC served more than 91,200 unique Veterans, of which approximately 23% served in OEF/OIF/OND.

Salisbury VAMC houses the VISN 6 Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Centers (MIRECC) Education Component (a translational research, education and clinical center that develops and applies scientific knowledge and best practices to enhance post-deployment mental health and wellness for our Nation's Veterans and their families), MIRECC research studies, and 3 MIRECC fellowships. The focus of this site of the MIRECC is traumatic brain injury (TBI) and common comorbid conditions in post deployment Veterans.

Research at this site is led by Dr. Katherine Taber, a generalist neurobiologist with expertise in neurophysiology, neuroimaging, functional neuroanatomy, neuropsychiatric disorders, and TBI and Dr. Robin Hurley, internationally recognized expert and Diplomate of both the American Board of Psychiatry and the United Council for Neurologic Subspecialties Certification in Behavioral Neurology & Neuropsychiatry. Drs. Hurley and Taber have provided TBI expertise to the development of national programs including the TBI screening/comprehensive TBI evaluation system of care, mild TBI clinical practice guideline, as well as to multiple national workgroups, taskforces, grant review panels, and advisory committees.

Their neuroimaging research utilizes the magnetoencephalography (MEG) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) facilities and expertise of their primary academic affiliate, Wake Forest School of Medicine. The MEG facility contains a 275-channel whole-head neuromagnetometer housed within a 208 ft2 Vacuumschmelze magnetically-shielded room, 10 dedicated high performance workstations, a five terabyte RAID array for data storage, and a 20-node computer cluster for data processing. MRI research utilizes a dedicated research Siemens 3T Skyra MRI scanner. MRI stimulus delivery equipment located in the Imaging Center includes MR-compatible visual display goggles with an integrated infrared eye-tracker. In addition to the imaging equipment, the Imaging Center has an informatics section, with two dedicated 4-dimensional GE Image Workstations that are used for post-image acquisition data manipulation, including temporal analysis of three-dimensional data sets.

Dr. Jared Rowland, Ph.D.
Dr. Katherine Taber, Ph.D.